Online Content: Does it encourage students to miss lectures?

The musicology session I taught today was another step in the direction of using technology to assist with module delivery. Using Panopto, I have recorded one of my sessions for the first time. Although not edited in anyway – what students can see is essentially the lecture as it was delivered. However, does content such as this encourage students to miss lectures? This is something I would be interested in finding out about.

The session we discussed was the final partof a nine-part lecture series, and focused on amongst many other things about the difference between what William Echarddescribes as Cliches and Typical Features. I am not going to explain what they are at this point – watch the video if you are interst. I would be interested in examples of either of those in this blogTo view the fully featured one, click on this link or for the streaming MP4 version (mobile friendly) click here

About Paul Carr

Academic working at the University of Glamorgan
This entry was posted in Musicology, Uncategorized and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

17 Responses to Online Content: Does it encourage students to miss lectures?

  1. Mike Morgan says:

    From experience of being a student and teaching I would definitely think that a tool like this would cause students to miss lectures. Would a password protection system work where students who have attended the lessons could be given a code to access this material? This could still encourage students to attend lectures then?
    It does seem a great tool to use though. Especially during assessments of presentation! Do you just need a webcam to operate it Paul?
    Thanks
    Mike

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  2. carza says:

    Thanks Mike – excellent idea. It works with a webcam. The data is uploaded to a central server, and can then be edited to some degree (although limited).

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  3. Anonymous says:

    How about online lectures with assessed seminars every week? (Or a reflective journal in which students are required to reference their peers’ weekly contributions)?

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  4. Simon Parton says:

    Paul – I agree with Mike, when I first heard about it, I thought, surely it gives people an excuse not to come in (not me! haha). Otherwise, it looks great! Really helpful tool and I’m sure it will prove to be very useful.

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  5. telemann1967 says:

    I’ve found that such recordings are actually counter-productive. You know how once in a while you’ll come across a podcast you think sounds interesting, subscribe to it and find six months later that you’ve not actually listened to any of the recordings. You don’t have the time right? Students don’t either. Add into the equation stammers and filler words that we don’t even know we’re using while we lecture, and you’ve got a very boring listening experience that’ll have students very quickly reaching for the off button — or perhaps for their Frank Zappa playlist.

    The real bugbear is that it also becomes a parachute that students don’t use. I tried recording lectures a couple of years ago and found that. Some students didn’t attend the lecture thinking they can go and listen to the video in the library, which they never got around to. The result was a higher fail rate.

    This trimester I’m trying something new. I’m going to have different staff record five-to-ten minute mini-lectures that cover an introduction to the subject. Students who miss the lecture don’t entirely miss the content, students who do attend have an additional resource, and it can act as an introduction to the material. We’re going to put it up on the institute’s Moodle site so it becomes available in the order in which we want, and stays there until the end of the trimester. It’ll be interesting to see how it goes.

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  6. telemann1967 says:

    You might also like to have a read of this paper on short-format podcasting as a tool for the sciences. http://eprints.qut.edu.au/42399/

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  7. Anonymous says:

    Aberystwyths experience is that attendance went up, they only saw a drop off in 3% of their students. Students are quite strategic in what they do and don’t do, especially when they have a hand-in, or a personal issue to deal with at the same time, so this is a good solution for that. I am biased though.

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  8. David Lewis says:

    Aberystwyths experience is that attendance went up, they only saw a drop off in 3% of their students. Students are quite strategic in what they do and don’t do, especially when they have a hand-in, or a personal issue to deal with at the same time, so this is a good solution for that. I am biased though.

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  9. carza says:

    I like it – great idea.

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  10. carza says:

    Thanks David

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  11. arcademanicfire says:

    I think it would encourage people to miss lectures, as it is an easier option to learn at your own pace, however this is not entirely fair on individuals who do attend the lectures. But I like the concept of using the video as a point of reference- perhaps it is only worthwhile recording if there is a ‘wrap up’ lecture?

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  12. Polly Moore says:

    I think it would encourage people to miss lectures, as it is an easier option to learn at your own pace, however this is not entirely fair on individuals who do attend the lectures. But I like the concept of using the video as a point of reference- perhaps it is only worthwhile recording if there is a ‘wrap up’ lecture?

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  13. Mike Depres says:

    It would seem that recording an early hour lecure would make students think twice about getting up. Perhaps if an afternoon session was recording, it wouldn’t matter so much because everyone would (should) be up.

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  14. Benjamin Franks says:

    You may find that you don’t understand the information properly if you don’t go to the lecture, and your computer can’t answer your queries. I agree with telemann that you might think, oh, the lecture is on the internet, I will just watch it sometime and never get round to watching it. As Polly said it is good if there is a specific lecture recorded such as how to write the essays. I think that some people will miss lectures whatever online info there is and also the others will still go, it is a social thing too, talking about Frank Zappa with your buddies (although i missed this lecture myself, not happy with myself about that)

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  15. Emily Evans says:

    It is a good idea to post lectures online as it gives students the chance to re-cap memories or go over anything they are unsure of. Although, by having access online, it does tempt people to not attend the lectures and to watch it in the comfort of their home instead, but never really getting around to doing it (honestly, in my case scenario). But, as Ben has said, having it online doesnt help us with any questions or queries we might have, and also would make people lack in concentration by watching it in their own time. By attending a lecture, it gives a purpose to listen and concentrate, and to ask for any help needed.

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  16. Phil Johncock says:

    Personally, I think it has some good potential, It offers students the chance to re-watch lectures where they struggled to take everything in. However there needs to be a way to stop some students replacing real, live lectures with these recorded ones. I sort of agree with polly about it being unfair on the people who come in, so perhaps only the people who come in will go away with a password to get access to a video… just an idea.

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